Tag Archives: docs

Using Google Keep for Research on the Web

Full credit for the source at the bottom of this article.

When you are using the Web for research, it is often easier and faster to use a desktop machine, with your Gsuite account and the Keep extension installed in your browser. Note that the process detailed below does NOT work on a device [tablet or phone].


When it comes to fast, informal online research, the Google Keep Chrome extension could be the ticket. Just save a link—along with a label and note—then export your Keep notes to Google Docs.

Three Google tools—Chrome, Google Keep and Google Docs—streamline the web research process. The Google Keep Chrome extension, specifically, lets you save, annotate and categorize web links, then export a selected set of saved Google Keep notes to a Google Doc.

The Keep extension eliminates the need to select a site’s URL, copy it, paste it into a document, add a note, then return to browse additional search results.

To streamline the whole process, make sure you have Chrome installed and are signed in with your Google account. The steps below cover how to install the Keep extension (a one-time process) as well as the routine research sequence.

SEE: How to quickly add to Google Keep from Chrome (TechRepublic)

Web research: Search, review, annotate, label and save

As you search and browse the web, anytime you want to save a web link, select the Keep extension. This automatically captures the URL for the page, creates a Keep note with the link, and places the cursor in the Keep Note field. Add any relevant text in the note (e.g., why this link is relevant, important items about the page or any commentary on the contents). Optionally, you may add a title to your note.

Screenshot that shows the Keep extension selected on an HP printer detail page, with the link in the top portion of the note, text added by the author in the note "About $650, but not currently in stock" and a title also typed in, "HP Color LaserJet Pro". Two labels added: All-in-one and Printers.
Select the Keep extension to create a note with the link to the web page. Optionally, you may add text, labels, and a note title.

You can use labels to categorize Keep notes. Select the label icon, then either type text to create a new label or select a previously added label from the list that displays. You may apply more than one label to a Keep note (e.g., for printer research, I might apply not only a “printers” label, but also an “all-in-one” label for devices with a scanner).

SEE: How to use Google Meet (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

On every web page you want to save, repeat the process:
Select the Keep icon and add text and labels.

Go to keep.google.com to review your saved links and notes.
Select from the list of labels (displayed on the left) to filter your Keep notes and only display those with the selected label.

Screenshot that shows Printers label selected at keep.google.com, with two of three notes selected.
At keep.google.com on the web, select a label to show only notes with that label.

You can export a set of Keep notes into a single Google Doc.

There are several ways to filter and select notes.
–> Select a label (along the left) to display all notes with that label.
-> Press Ctrl+A to select all displayed notes.
-> Or, move the cursor over a note, then click near the circle with a check mark in it (in the upper-left section of each note) to select or deselect it.

Once you have selected the set of Keep notes to export, select the More menu (the three-vertical dot menu in the upper right) and choose Copy To Google Docs .

Choose Open Doc (in the lower left) to display the Google Doc created from your selected Keep notes.

At this point, your Google Doc contains the links, notes and titles from your selected Google Keep notes. Now you can edit your Google Doc as needed.

Screenshot with the Copy to Google Docs menu item displayed and an arrow pointing to the option.
After you have chosen notes to export, select the More menu (three vertical dots in the upper right), then Copy To Google Docs.
Screenshot that shows the "Copied to Google Docs" message (lower left of the screen) with an arrow pointing to the Open Doc link.
Select Open Doc to access the Google Doc created from your selected Keep notes.
Screenshot shows four URLs to printer-related pages, with text notes added by the author to three of the web pages, and one note title added.
The resulting Google Doc includes complete URL details and links from the saved Keep notes, along with any text and titles you added.

ORIGINAL SOURCE FOR THIS ARTICLE:

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/how-to-use-google-keep-for-web-research/

20 more Google Docs tips

The ORIGINAL ARTICLE – below are the “headlines”.

  1. Search Google Docs and Gmail together

  2. Search Google Docs more effectively

  3. Quickly back up all your documents offline

  4. Max out your editing space

  5. Share docs with non-Google Docs users

  6. Star multiple documents at once

  7. View a video’s technical details

  8. Explore the templates

  9. Automatically correct common typos

  10. Click and drag images into docs

  11. Fix pictures in position

  12. Insert links in a snap

  13. Use Bookmarks to navigate long documents

  14. Use the word processor to create Web pages

  15. Work with multiple currencies in a spreadsheet

  16. Use Rules to color code spreadsheets

  17. Gather spreadsheet data using forms

  18. See Google Docs previews in Gmail

  19. Create drawings within presentations

  20. Save drawings in scalable form

Google Docs continues to improve practically every month as new features arise. A good way of keeping up with the additions is to monitor the Google Docs Blog, which the team behind Docs writes.

Google Docs – 8 more tips

The article with the details can be found HERE.

Here’s the summary:

  1. Show all keyboard shortcuts:
    • On Mac, press ⌘ /
    • On Windows, press Ctrl /
  2. Use Gmail keyboard shortcuts in List View
    • J  Navigate to the next item in the list
    • K  Navigate to the previous item in the list
    • X  Select/unselect an item
    • S  Star/unstar an item
  3. Less distracting –> Edit Fullscreen [View menu–> Fullscreen. Hit the ESC key to exit.]
  4. Hack the Header styles to quickly add formatting:   To create a new header style, simply format your text how you’d like and highlight it. Then go to the Title menu, click one of the right facing arrows next to a header, and select Update ‘heading X’ to match with X being the header number.
  5. Use the Google Templates to get started:   directory of templates
  6. Let Docs create the Table of contents – only works if you’ve used the header levels in the Title menu. Insert menu –> Table of Contents
  7. Use Conditional Formatting to change the color of a spreadsheet cell based on the contents. For example, you can have the cell color automatically change to red if the test score is less than a 75.
    To do this, hover over the column header and click the arrow icon that appears to bring up a menu. Then click the Conditional formatting… option towards the bottom.
  8. Extrapolate sets of related terms. You’ll just have to read the original for this – but it IS pretty cool – useful is another question altogether, though!