Get better at using your iPad [and save time]

As one article says, ‘It’s important to learn the ways you can navigate in the OS with as little friction as possible”…. in other words, get your work done faster with fewer headaches.

Click the link below to get to an article that tells you how to

  1. Select Multiple items for a single drag-n-drop
  2. Tap / Hold to get recent documents
  3. Multitask Apps by searching
  4. Go to Home Screen, or show the dock
  5. Use a two-finger cursor for selecting a lot of text

Want more details?

https://www.techrepublic.com/article/the-top-ipad-pro-keyboard-and-screen-shortcuts/

Why your iPad offloads apps

You can save some space on your iPad by “offloading” apps. What this means is that the actual program is deleted, but NOT your data. What’s left is a note that the iPad leaves for itself telling it what app and where to fetch it the next time you need it.

Again – NONE of your data is affected.

This opens up room on your iPad for other content.

Apple offers two ways to offload apps:

Automatically. Visit Settings > General > iTunes & App Stores. Offload Unused Apps is enabled by default, although you can turn it off if you find this behavior confusing or inconvenient. iOS doesn’t warn you when it offloads apps to increase storage, so you may try to use an app you haven’t touched in a while, only to find that it’s been offloaded. This may be a problem if you don’t have affordable or sufficient bandwidth to download it on the spot.

Manually. Open Settings > General > iPhone/iPad Storage, and then swipe down to find apps you want to offload. Tap the app and then tap Offload App. iOS explains what that means, and you have to tap Offload App again in a pop-up menu.

The next time you want to use an app that’s been offloaded, you can simply tap it and it will be downloaded and reconnected to its cached data.


Source: https://www.macworld.com/article/3395876/why-ios-offloads-apps-and-how-to-reinstall-them.html

Computing, GrandPa style

See the source image
Macintosh System 1
See the source image
Windows version 1.0

What we are used to computing-wise today all comes from a long line of predecessors that were created by a slew of talented people. Little things like pointers, folders, desktops, networking, WIRELESS networking…. all have had a long development.

Want to see what computing used to look like? Now, you can – inside any modern web browser.

Click the links below, and you can run older version of the Macintosh OS or Windows.

MacOS 7: https://jamesfriend.com.au/pce-js/

Win 3.0: https://www.pcjs.org/disks/pcx86/windows/3.00/

Win 3.1: https://classicreload.com/win3x-windows-31.html


Win 95: https://win95.ajf.me/

Even more:

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2014/01/7-classic-versions-of-windows-and-mac-os-you-can-run-in-a-browser/